Old/Newish Albums: Crosby, Stills & Nash’s Self-titled

converted PNM fileI can objectively say that this is a great album, and I can subjectively say that I only think about half of it is good (a healthy amount of this review was contributed by my wife, as she likes this album a lot and had more thoughts on it than I did).

Crosby, Stills & Nash was a huge hit for a debut, and this is a due to a number of reasons:

First, each of these guys had at least somewhat of a built-in fan base, as they’d all come from different bands. David Crosby had been a member of The Byrds, Stephen Stills came from Buffalo Springfield, and Graham Nash had co-founded The Hollies.

Second, they all brought something different to the musical table. Crosby was writing incisive political/social commentary, Stills was a skilled musician who was rooted in a strong folk and country background, and Nash was particularly adept at writing catchy pop melodies.

Third, these differences coalesced. It’s one thing to be varying musical talents and elements to a group, but it’s rare to see such musical diversity gel so well.

The blend of these three disparate artists really created a unique experience on record. It’s so hard for me to actually pin down a genre for this album, because of how specifically different some of these songs sound from each other. I’d almost argue that this is typical for Crosby, Stills & Nash (and sometimes Young).  “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” doesn’t sound like “Long Time Gone” (which points much more towards “Woodstock” and the rest of their Deja Vu record), and that doesn’t sound like “49 Bye-Byes.” And then you’ve got “Marrakesh Express,” which doesn’t sound like anything I’ve ever heard before.

It seems like a real mish-mash, but somehow it works. There are places where it is sounds complex (“49 Bye-Byes”) and places where simplicity rules (“Helplessly Hoping”). It’s not often too much either way, and just strikes the right balances throughout almost the entire thing.

That’s not to say it’s not without a few duds. “Lady Of The Island” sounds like a poor emulation of Simon & Garfunkel and both “Wooden Ships” and “Long Time Gone” are a little heavy-handed for this album. Maybe it’s just that I dislike most of CS&N’s political work, not just on this album but on their subsequent releases. The places where this album excels are where they stay rooted in acoustic folk blended with a pop flavor.

And their voices, for crying out loud. These three guys blend so perfectly. And the harmonies they’re creating on this album aren’t just your typical “first, third, fifth” chord parts. The melody/harmony blend on this album is far beyond my understanding of music theory, but damn if it doesn’t sound great.

This is demonstrated to best effect on “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” and maybe I’m not crazy about this album because of how great I think the album opener is. The rest of the album can’t compare with this song.

Top 3 Tunes:

  1. Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
  2. 49 Bye-Byes
  3. Helplessly Hoping
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